Your North Carolina Representatives in Congress and How to Contact Them

Graphic by Francesca Daly for Cardinal & Pine

By Keya Vakil

February 16, 2023

North Carolina is represented in Congress by 14 lawmakers—7 Republicans and 7 Democrats. They hold a wide array of views on critical issues, ranging from education to abortion. Here’s what you need to know about your representatives and how to contact them.

We’re just over a month into the new session of Congress, one in which Republicans control the US House of Representatives and Democrats control the Senate. While divided government means that there may be fewer big pieces of legislation passed than during the last Congress, the business of governing continues—and the people you voted for will determine what that governance looks like. 

North Carolina is represented in Congress by 14 lawmakers—7 Republicans and 7 Democrats. They hold a wide array of views on critical issues, ranging from education to abortion to taxation. Here’s what you need to know about your representative and how to contact them.

1st Congressional District 

If you live in the Black Belt, other portions of rural, northeastern North Carolina, or the outer exurbs of the Research Triangle, chances are you’re represented by newly-elected Democratic Congressman Don Davis.

Davis, an Air Force veteran, educator, and minister, was elected as Mayor of Snow Hill at age 29 and then served as a state Senator for more than a decade before being elected to Congress in November.

Now in Congress, Davis has already introduced legislation that would allow the federal government to partner directly with local government to expand Medicaid coverage, bypassing NC state Republicans who’ve refused to expand Medicaid for nearly a decade.

“Expanding accessible health care is one of my top priorities in Congress. The North Carolina state legislature has failed to expand Medicaid,” Davis said in a press release. “Failure to do so ultimately prevents more than 95,000 eastern North Carolinians from accessing lifesaving health care and bringing more than 3,000 jobs to the east.”

Davis’ other priorities include improving public education in rural communities, expanding access to broadband, and helping struggling farmers. He also supports greater investments in education, career training, health, and housing assistance for veterans to help veterans deal with mental health crises.

Constituents who want to reach Rep. Davis can call him at either of his two offices:

Greenville: (252) 999-7600

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-3101

2nd Congressional District 

If you live in Raleigh or other parts of Wake County, Democrat Deborah Ross is your representative in Congress.

Ross is a UNC Law School graduate and has lived in the Raleigh area for more than 25 years. She served in the state House of Representatives from 2003 to 2013 and was elected to Congress in 2020.

During her first term in Congress, Ross helped pass crucial legislation that lowered the cost of health insurance for millions of Americans, implemented an insulin copay cap for seniors, and made once-in-a-generation investments in American infrastructure, manufacturing, and mental health.

Ross’ priorities include defending abortion rights and the freedom to vote, overhauling America’s broken childcare and elder care systems, increasing the minimum wage, and making community college more affordable.

Constituents can contact Rep. Ross at either of her two offices:

Raleigh: (919) 334-0840

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-3032. 

3rd Congressional District 

If you live along the coast of North Carolina, there’s a pretty good chance you’re represented by Congressman Greg Murphy, a Republican from Greenville.

Murphy previously served as a traveling medical missionary, worked at the Vidant Medical Center in Greenville, and taught at the Eastern Carolina University School of Medicine.

Murphy served in the state House from 2015 to 2019, before winning a special election and joining Congress.

During his time in Congress, Murphy voted for the 2017 Trump tax cuts, which largely benefited big corporations and the very rich. He also voted to overturn the 2020 presidential election and celebrated the demise of Roe v. Wade.

In a since-deleted tweet responding to the end of Roe, Murphy also proclaimed that “no one forces anyone to have sex.”

Constituents can contact Rep. Murphy at any of his five offices:

Manteo: (252) 230-3549

Greenville: (252) 931-1003

Jacksonville: (910) 937-6929

New Bern: (252) 636-6612

Washington D.C.: (202) 225-3415

4th Congressional District 

If you live in Durham or the surrounding areas in Orange, Granville, or Franklin Counties, there’s a pretty good chance you’re represented by Congresswoman Valerie Foushee.

An Orange County native, Foushee was elected to Congress in 2022, following stints on the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City School Board and the Orange County Board of Commissioners, and 10 years in the North Carolina General Assembly.

Foushee is a strong supporter of reproductive freedom, wants to increase workers’ wages, and would vote to ban members of Congress from owning and trading individual stocks. She also supports gun safety laws and efforts to shift the country towards clean energy.

Constituents can contact Rep. Foushee by phone at either of her offices:

Durham: (919) 967-7924

Washington D.C.: (202) 225-1784

5th Congressional District 

If you live in northwestern North Carolina, there’s a pretty good chance you’re represented by Congresswoman Virginia Foxx.

Foxx has served in Congress since 2005, where she has been a staunch opponent of abortion rights, LGBTQ rights (including gay marriage), and the Affordable Care Act, which helped hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians get health insurance for the first time.

Foxx also supports allowing parents to use public, taxpayer dollars to cover the cost of tuition at for-profit private schools.

Following the 2020 election, Foxx was one of 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the presidential election results.

Constituents can contact Rep. Foxx by phone at any of her three offices:

Boone: (828) 265-0240

Clemmons: (336) 778-0211

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-2071

6th Congressional District 

If you live in the Piedmont Triad, chances are you’re represented by Congresswoman Kathy Manning.

Manning represents the 6th district, which includes all of Guilford and Rockingham counties and certain parts of Forsyth and Caswell counties.

Manning has lived in Greensboro since 1987 and worked as an attorney before being elected to Congress in 2020.

During her time in Congress, Manning has voted to lower the cost of prescription drugs and health care premiums and to invest tens of billions of dollars in North Carolina’s infrastructure.

Manning also wants to protect Social Security and Medicare and supports gun safety legislation, including comprehensive background checks, closing loopholes for gun show sales, red flag laws, and banning bump stocks and high capacity magazines.

Constituents can contact Rep. Manning by phone at either of her two offices:

Greensboro: (336) 333-5005

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-3065

7th Congressional District 

If you live in Wilmington or other parts of southeastern North Carolina, there’s a good chance you’re represented by Republican Rep. David Rouzer.

Rouzer represents the state’s 7th congressional district, which includes Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover, Pender, and Robeson counties, as well as part of Cumberland County.

Early in his career, Rouzer worked on the staffs of Sen. Jesse Helms and Sen. Elizabeth Dole. He also did a stint at the US Department of Agriculture during the George W. Bush administration.

Rouzer served in the NC state Senate from 2009-2012 and was elected to Congress in 2014.

During his time in Congress, Rouzer has celebrated the demise of Roe v. Wade, opposed gun safety legislation, and voted for the Trump tax cuts, which disproportionately helped the super rich and corporations.

Rouzer also voted to overturn the 2020 presidential election results in an effort to keep Donald Trump in office.

Constituents can contact Rep. Rouzer by phone at any of his four offices:

Brunswick County: (910) 253-6111

New Hanover County: (910) 395-0202

Robeson County: (910) 702-6140

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-2731

8th Congressional District 

If you live directly east or northeast of Charlotte, there’s a pretty high likelihood you’re represented in Congress by Republican Dan Bishop.

Bishop represents the state’s 8th congressional district, which includes all of Anson, Davidson, Montgomery, Rowan, Stanly, and Union counties as well as parts of Cabarrus and Richmond counties.

Bishop was first elected to Congress in 2018, but is perhaps best known for spearheading the infamous “bathroom bill” during his time in the North Carolina General Assembly. That bill, which banned transgender people from using public restrooms other than those of their sex at birth, led to widespread backlash and cost the state significant revenue and investments before it was ultimately repealed.

Bishop opposed that repeal and compared LGBT rights activists to the Taliban.

Since entering Congress, Bishop has voted to overturn the 2020 presidential election results, and celebrated the repeal of Roe v. Wade.

Constituents can contact Rep. Bishop by phone at either of his offices:

Monroe: (704) 218-5300

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-197

9th Congressional District 

If you live in south-central North Carolina, chances are your representative in Congress is Republican Richard Hudson.

Hudson represents the state’s 9th congressional district, which includes all of Chatham, Hoke, Lee, Moore, Randolph, and Scotland counties and parts of Cumberland, Harnett, and Richmond counties.

Hudson served as a staffer for several Republican representatives early in his career, including North Carolina Congresswoman Virginia Foxx. He also worked as Pat McCrory’s campaign manager during his unsuccessful campaign for governor in 2008.

Hudson was first elected to Congress in 2012. During his time in Congress, he’s co-sponsored a resolution to amend the US Constitution to ban same-sex marriage, supported Donald Trump’s Muslim ban, voted to take healthcare away from hundreds of thousands of North Carolina residents, and voted to overturn the 2020 presidential election results.

In 2022, he also celebrated the repeal of Roe v. Wade.

Constituents can contact Rep. Hudson by phone at any of his three offices:

Fayetteville: (910) 997-2070

Southern Pines: (910) 910-1924

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-3715

10th Congressional District 

If you live in central or western North Carolina, there’s a decent chance you’re represented in Congress by Republican Patrick McHenry.

McHenry represents the state’s 10th congressional district, which includes all of Alexander, Burke, Catawba, Cleveland, Iredell, and Lincoln counties, and parts of Caldwell, Gaston, and Rutherford counties.

McHenry was first elected to Congress in 2004 at the age of 29. Prior to that, he served in the Bush Administration’s Department of Labor and served one term in the State House.

During his time in Congress, McHenry has celebrated the demise of Roe v. Wade, voted to cut taxes for the super rich and corporations, voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act and take away health insurance from hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians, and voted against several gun safety bills.

Constituents can contact Rep. McHenry by phone at any of his three offices:

Hickory: (828) 327-6100

Mooresville: (800) 477-2576

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-2576

11th Congressional District 

If you live in Western North Carolina, there’s a good chance you’re represented in Congress by Republican Chuck Edwards.

Edwards represents the state’s 11th congressional district, which includes 15 counties, including Buncombe County.

Edwards worked at McDonald’s early in his career, working his way up the ladder over the course of nine years. He later worked as the president of Henderson County Partners for Economic Progress. Edwards was appointed to the North Carolina Senate in 2016 and served there for six years, before being elected to Congress in November.

Edwards celebrated the end of Roe v. Wade, supports “school choice” measures that would divert taxpayer dollars to private and charter schools, and has already co-sponsored legislation in the House to make it easier to carry concealed guns across state lines.

Constituents can contact Rep. Edwards by phone at either of his offices:

Hendersonville: (828) 435-7310

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-6401

12th Congressional District 

If you live in Charlotte and other parts of Mecklenburg County to the northeast, there’s a good chance you’re represented in Congress by Democrat Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, PhD.

Adams has represented the state’s 12th congressional district since 2014, after a 20 year stint in the North Carolina House of Representatives.

Born in High Point, Adams got her Bachelors and Masters degrees from North Carolina A&T University and her PhD from Ohio State University. Prior to joining the State House, she served on the Greensboro City School Board and on the Greensboro City Council.

Adams is only the second woman of color to represent North Carolina in the House. She is a co-founder of the Black Maternal Health Caucus and has also prioritized securing funds for North Carolina’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

During her time in Congress, Adams has repeatedly supported women’s reproductive freedom, voted to lower health care and drug costs, and advocated for the full restoration of the Voting Rights Act in order to protect the rights of Black voters.

Constituents can contact Rep. Adams by phone at either of her offices:

Charlotte: (704) 344-9950

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-1510 

13th Congressional District 

If you live in the Raleigh area or parts south and east, there’s a good chance you’re represented in Congress by Congressman Wiley Nickel.

Nickel, a Democrat, represents the state’s 13th congressional district, which includes Johnston County and parts of Harnett, Wake, and Wayne counties.

Nickel was elected to Congress in November following a term in the North Carolina state Senate. He’s also been a criminal defense attorney in Cary.

Nickel fought to expand Medicaid as a state senator, supports abortion rights, wants to raise taxes on big corporations but not working families, and wants greater investments in affordable housing.

He also wants to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks and to overturn the Citizens United court ruling that allowed unlimited dark money spending in elections.

Constituents can contact Rep. Nickel by phone at either of his offices:

Garner: (984) 275-6150

Washington, D.C.: (202) 225-4531

14th Congressional District 

If you live in Charlotte or some of the surrounding areas like Gastonia and Mount Holly, there’s a good chance you’re represented in Congress by Democrat Jeff Jackson.

Jeff Jackson represents the state’s 14th congressional district, which includes the southern half of Mecklenburg County and most of Gaston County.

Jackson was elected to Congress in November following two terms in the North Carolina state Senate. Prior to his time in elected office, Jackson served in the US Army Reserves, attended law school, and worked as an assistant district attorney in Gaston County.

Jackson fought to expand Medicaid as a state senator, supports abortion rights, and supports greater investments in affordable childcare, housing, and education.

He also wants to get dark money out of politics, supports universal background checks for gun purchases, and is a defender of LGBTQ rights.

Constituents can contact Rep. Jackson by phone at his Washington, DC office at (202) 225-5634. 

Author

  • Keya Vakil

    Keya Vakil is the deputy political editor at COURIER. He previously worked as a researcher in the film industry and dabbled in the political world.

CATEGORIES: Uncategorized

Politics

Local News

Related Stories
Share This