Stories tagged: "racism"


Durham artist Darius Quarles at work on a mural honoring local hip hop icons Little Brother. (Photo courtesy of Darius Quarles)
How Durham’s Darius Quarles Went From Fledgling Painter to a Leader in North Carolina’s Arts Scene

Quarles battled racism, a pandemic, and a breakneck pace to become a major artist of color in a predominantly white North Carolina scene. 

George White had an astounding political career, beginning in 1881 with his election from Craven to serve in the North Carolina House of Representatives. In 1885 he served in the State Senate. In 1896 White moved to Tarboro and launched a successful bid for a national seat. Voters in what was called the “Black Second” Congressional District, had already sent three African Americans to Congress. White was elected twice, and was the last remaining Black US Congressman when he introduced the first antilynching bill in 1900.
This NC Lawmaker Called for an Antilynching Law 100 Years Ago. This Week, We Got One.

The US will finally make lynching a federal crime, after more than a century of attempts. C&P looks at the long road to justice. It only took 122 years to declare lynching a federal hate crime, after a long-sought bill passed Congress this week.  The Emmett Till Antilynching Act passed the US House with three...

DeWitt Powell, Jones Lake's longtime park superintendent, vigilantly guarded the atmosphere of peace and dignity of the park. No litter or profanity was permitted, and Black families could camp, hike, fish, swim or just relax on the lake's shores. Powell, who held his post for decades,  established that atmosphere in the Jim Crow era, against the odds in rural Bladen County.
How the ‘MLK of Jones Lake’ Made This NC Park an Island of Equality

Jones Lake State Park, North Carolina’s first to admit Black visitors, was a place guests could breathe freely, thanks to its first Black park superintendent.

Supporters of those charged in the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol pass a counter-protester with a 'LOSER' sign in Washington, DC. North Carolina was home to 18 of the insurrectionists. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
How to Stop the Insurrectionist Next Door

Of the Jan. 6 insurrectionists, 18 called North Carolina home. Here's how seemingly normal people become extremists, how to spot it and ways to stop it.

Geeta Kapur, a civil rights attorney from North Carolina, is the author of the new book "To Drink From the Well: The Struggle for Racial Equality at the Nation's Oldest Public University." (Image via Geeta Kapur)
UNC’s ‘Racist Roots’ Fueled Nikole Hannah-Jones Scandal and Legacy of Injustices, Legal Scholar Says

Enslaved people literally laid the bricks at UNC. So how does its past reflect on the turmoil of today?

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones stands for a portrait at her home in New York, Tuesday, July 6, 2021. A controversy over tenure at UNC-Chapel Hill has supercharged debates in North Carolina about teaching the state's history of racism in K-12 and higher education. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
‘What Gets Taught Matters’: Why North Carolina Must Confront Its History of Racism

The author of a North Carolina history book explains why it’s so crucial for the state’s K-12 students to understand our state’s history of racism.

Mourners attend the funeral for Andrew Brown Jr. May 3 at Fountain of Life Church in Elizabeth City . (Image via AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Reaction to Andrew Brown’s Death Shows Whose Lives Matter in Elizabeth City – And Beyond

As marchers and civil rights leaders seek to humanize the man killed by deputies in Elizabeth City, it’s white folks who need to be listening.