Stories tagged: "eastern NC"


Sandy Smith, Republican candidate for U.S. House District 1 from North Carolina, speaks to the crowd at former President Donald Trump's rally Friday, Sept. 23, 2022, in Wilmington, N.C. (AP Photo/Chris Seward)
5 Things To Know About Embattled NC Congressional Candidate Sandy Smith

The eastern North Carolina candidate has former President Trump’s endorsement, but she’s been dogged by controversy.

Myra McDuffie, co-owner of MeMa's Chick'n' & Ribs, says she wants her eastern North Carolina barbecue restaurant to be more than just another good barbecue restaurant.
After Hurricane Florence, This Black-Owned Barbecue Restaurant Was the Only Place In Town to Get Food

The McDuffies' Pender County restaurant was a life-saver after the storm. Today, they want to sustain their town in more ways than one. 

Yum! The Venus fly trap, a native of Wilmington, does its thing with a common house fly. (Shutterstock)
Ghosts, Gnomes, and Carnivorous Plants: 8 Spots To Get Weird in Wilmington

North Carolina's eccentric port city is a destination, and not just because lots of TV shows were filmed there.

W. Mondale Robinson in a photo from his campaign for mayor. (Courtesy of W. Mondale Robinson.)
‘Radical Hope’: Enfield Mayor W. Mondale Robinson’s Mission to Save His Hometown

One of eastern North Carolina’s oldest towns is also one of its poorest. But a progressive advocate turned local mayor has his eyes on a better future.

This May 8, 1964 file photo shows Linda Brown Smith standing in front of the Sumner School in Topeka, Kansas. The refusal of the public school to admit Brown in 1951, then nine years old, because she is black, led to the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court overruled the "separate but equal" clause and mandated that schools nationwide must be desegregated. Tuesday marks the 68th anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision. (AP Photo, File)
68 Years After Brown v. Board of Education, the Work to Desegregate Our Schools Isn’t Finished 

Today marks a watershed moment in American history. But history is still being written. 

George White had an astounding political career, beginning in 1881 with his election from Craven to serve in the North Carolina House of Representatives. In 1885 he served in the State Senate. In 1896 White moved to Tarboro and launched a successful bid for a national seat. Voters in what was called the “Black Second” Congressional District, had already sent three African Americans to Congress. White was elected twice, and was the last remaining Black US Congressman when he introduced the first antilynching bill in 1900.
This NC Lawmaker Called for an Antilynching Law 100 Years Ago. This Week, We Got One.

The US will finally make lynching a federal crime, after more than a century of attempts. C&P looks at the long road to justice. It only took 122 years to declare lynching a federal hate crime, after a long-sought bill passed Congress this week.  The Emmett Till Antilynching Act passed the US House with three...

DeWitt Powell, Jones Lake's longtime park superintendent, vigilantly guarded the atmosphere of peace and dignity of the park. No litter or profanity was permitted, and Black families could camp, hike, fish, swim or just relax on the lake's shores. Powell, who held his post for decades,  established that atmosphere in the Jim Crow era, against the odds in rural Bladen County.
How the ‘MLK of Jones Lake’ Made This NC Park an Island of Equality

Jones Lake State Park, North Carolina’s first to admit Black visitors, was a place guests could breathe freely, thanks to its first Black park superintendent.