Here’s your chance to weigh in on NC’s new voter ID policy

The final day of early voting at a polling location at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

By Michael McElroy

November 19, 2023

The North Carolina Board of Elections (NCBOE) has opened a public comment period on two proposed rules for how the ID policy will be implemented and voters’ identities will be confirmed.

The new election with Voter ID in North Carolina has come and gone, and now state election officials want to hear directly from the voters about potential adjustments to the process.

The North Carolina Board of Elections (NCBOE) has opened a public comment period on two proposed rules for how the ID policy will be implemented and how voters’ identities will be confirmed.

“These rules are necessary to ensure uniform implementation of the photo ID requirement by all 100 county boards of elections and in all 3,000-plus polling locations,” the NCBOE said in a news release last week.

The first set of proposed rules seek to clarify the ID requirements for voting by mail, and the second set provides further guidance to officials who may have trouble determining if a photo “reasonably resembles” the voter.

How to comment

The public can share their thoughts on Dec. 13 at a public hearing at the state board’s office in Raleigh. They can also comment through the NCBOE portal (here); by email, (here); and by mail, (Rulemaking Coordinator, PO Box 27255, Raleigh, NC 27611-7255.) The comment period ends on Jan. 16, 2024.

Election officials will review all the comments and make a recommendation at a public meeting after the end of the comment period.

For a list of acceptable photo IDs and other information click here. Voters without one of these forms of ID can apply for a free photo ID through the Department of Motor Vehicles here. The new ID law also requires each county board of elections to provide a free ID to any voter who asks for one.

Officials are still reviewing how the process went in the 2023 municipal elections, but there were some reports of confusion about the Voter ID law, which kicked into effect this year after years of back and forth over the provision’s legality.

But both voting advocates and election officials are making a point to remind voters not to let the ID requirement stop them from voting.

There are several options for voters to claim an exception, and options for those who simply don’t have an ID on Election Day.

“All voters will be allowed to vote with or without a photo ID,” the BOE says.

Author

  • Michael McElroy

    Michael McElroy is Cardinal & Pine's political correspondent. He is an adjunct instructor at UNC-Chapel Hill's Hussman School of Journalism and Media, and a former editor at The New York Times.

CATEGORIES: POLITICS | VOTING
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